Nov
30
6:00 PM18:00

Writing Death

  • 20 Cooper Square, 7th floor commons New York, NY, 10003 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Wednesday, November 30th | 6:00-8:00PM 7th Floor Commons, 20 Cooper Square, NYC Open to the public   Refreshments will be served,  please RSVP here .  Presented by NYU Journalism and    The Center for the Study of Transformative Lives , moderated by Distinguished Writer in Residence, Pete Hamill- join us for a panel discussion on writing death. Featuring Sam Roberts of The New York Times, who writes many of the obituaries for that newspaper, he also writes book reviews, and does a weekly TV show focused on New York 1. At the same table will be NYU Journalism Professor Katie Roiphe whose acclaimed study of death called The Violet Hour: Great Writers at the End has much to teach all students of the human condition. She takes us through many of the final hours of Susan Sontag, Sigmund Freud, John Updike, Dylan Thomas, Maurice Sendak, and James Salter. 

Wednesday, November 30th | 6:00-8:00PM
7th Floor Commons, 20 Cooper Square, NYC Open to the public


Refreshments will be served, please RSVP here.

Presented by NYU Journalism and The Center for the Study of Transformative Lives, moderated by Distinguished Writer in Residence, Pete Hamill- join us for a panel discussion on writing death. Featuring Sam Roberts of The New York Times, who writes many of the obituaries for that newspaper, he also writes book reviews, and does a weekly TV show focused on New York 1. At the same table will be NYU Journalism Professor Katie Roiphe whose acclaimed study of death called The Violet Hour: Great Writers at the End has much to teach all students of the human condition. She takes us through many of the final hours of Susan Sontag, Sigmund Freud, John Updike, Dylan Thomas, Maurice Sendak, and James Salter. 

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Sep
22
2:00 PM14:00

The Book

  • Kimmel Center for University Life (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In 1894 Scribner’s Magazine ran an article entitled “The End of Books,” in which the author declared that “reading … soon brings on great weariness.” Since at least the nineteenth-century, enthusiasm for the book has been accompanied in equal parts by a great anxiety surrounding its staying power. The future of “the book” as a medium for the transfer and dissemination of knowledge is often dismissed as being passé and encouraging that “great weariness” – but we’re not yet bored. This panel features Katie Roiphe and other experts from diverse fields (journalism, English, media studies) as they address the pressing question of the meaning of “the book.”

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